Our strength lies in designing long‐lasting architectural frameworks that embody a client’s social, cultural, and functional needs, while providing a high degree of adaptability to anticipate future change.

Edward Ogosta Architecture Wins 2018 AIA|LA Emerging Practice Award

Architect’s Quiet, Minimal Environments Serve as Antidote to Excessive Living

Ed Ogosta

The American Institute of Architects Los Angeles Chapter (AIA|LA) recently bestowed the 2018 Emerging Practice Award upon Edward Ogosta Architecture, naming its founding principal Ed Ogosta, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, as one of the 2018 Presidential Honorees. This prestigious honor, given by the AIA’s third largest chapter, adds to the seven‐year‐old firm’s rapidly growing list of accolades announced in recent months. Ogosta’s eponymous practice crafts a subtle, intelligent architecture with clarity and experiential depth, and is known for its intuitive and contemporary vision of residential design, creative workplaces, and inventive commercial spaces.

“The firm elevates the conversation about architecture in neighborhoods through design excellence and the realization of quality design,” said the 2018 AIA|LA Presidential Honoree jury, comprising AIA|LA President Tania Van Herle, AIA, and the organization’s board of directors. The jury acknowledges recipients that are responsible for lasting contributions to the region, architecture, and future generations of designers.

Earlier this year, Ogosta was named to the 2018 Design Vanguard by Architectural Record. From a small international pool of 10 winners, Edward Ogosta Architecture was one of just three architectural practices awarded in the United States, and the only West Coast firm to receive this year’s honor. Ogosta has also been awarded at all three AIA levels (national, state, and local) for his ingenious design of Rear Window House, a modern renovation and addition to a 1940s bungalow in Los Angeles. The design for Rear Window House demonstrates how a thoughtful, strategic intervention can breathe new life into an older home, serve the needs of the contemporary family, and maintain neighborhood scale. The project’s accolades include a 2018 AIA National Small Project Award, 2018 AIA California Council Residential Design Award, 2018 Residential Architect Design Award, 2017 AIA|LA Residential Design Award, and the 2017 American Architecture Prize.

Minimal, sober, and serene, Ogosta’s architecture contrasts with the hyperactive formalism recently in fashion. He shares an affinity with artists, such as James Turrell and Robert Irwin, who engage light and material to explore ideas about spatial perception. Many of his award‐winning residential projects are designed to optimize daylight and cross‐ventilation, evoke atmosphere, and celebrate the most fundamental experiences of architecture. One such design is the Four Eyes House in Coachella Valley, CA, which was conceived with four sleeping towers oriented toward the sky and the landscape to channel changing levels of illumination during the course of a day.

Ogosta approaches every design with rigor, clarity, and pragmatism to solve issues of function, site, construction, and craft. “In our practice, we seek buildings that make intuitive sense at every scale, from the broadest notions of site planning down to the feeling of a door handle in the hand,” he says. “Our singular goal is quality in everything we do.”

Sustainable design is a driving force behind the practice, and a thorough integration of intelligent environmental strategies underpins every project. Exemplifying this approach is the Hangar Office, a converted warehouse for a leading provider of sustainable building maintenance services. A large solar photovoltaic array, a high‐efficiency heating and cooling system, super‐insulated walls and ceiling, and low‐flow plumbing fixtures contribute to its green design. The building became the first in Culver City to receive a LEED‐NC Platinum rating—the highest sustainability level awarded by the US Green Building Council.

“Our strength lies in designing long‐lasting architectural frameworks that embody a client’s social, cultural, and functional needs, while providing a high degree of adaptability to anticipate future change,” Ogosta says.

In addition to running his practice, Ogosta serves in local government as Chair of the Planning Commission for Culver City. This civic role reflects his deeply held belief in the value of architecture’s potential to serve the community. As a local resident and the only architect on the commission, he balances the responsibility of protecting the city’s architectural heritage and meeting citizen needs with pushing the boundaries of sustainability and design innovation in new developments.

Ogosta is committed to helping new generations succeed in the profession of architecture. He teaches design studios and classes in building technology and systems integration at Woodbury University in Burbank, CA, and often serves as an invited guest critic at several Los Angeles area architecture schools.

Ogosta studied at the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in architecture and graduated magna cum laude. He received his Master of Architecture degree from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Form Magazine

Author: Form Magazine

FORM: pioneering design, a publication that celebrates Southern California’s contribution to architecture, design, and the visual arts.

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